Internatioal dating rules

28-Feb-2017 18:54 by 7 Comments

Internatioal dating rules - facts about dating websites

(See § Cartographic practice and convention below.) A person who goes around the world from east to west (the same direction as Magellan's voyage) would gain or set their clock back one hour for every 15° of longitude crossed, and would gain 24 hours for one circuit of the globe from east to west if they did not compensate by setting their clock forward one day when they crossed the IDL.

The nautical date line, not the same as the IDL, is a de jure construction determined by international agreement.It is the result of the 1917 Anglo-French Conference on Time-keeping at Sea, which recommended that all ships, both military and civilian, adopt hourly standard time zones on the high seas. This date line is implied but not explicitly drawn on time zone maps.The United States adopted its recommendation for U. It follows the 180° meridian except where it is interrupted by territorial waters adjacent to land, forming gaps—it is a pole-to-pole dashed line.The 15° gore that is offset from UTC by 12 hours is bisected by the nautical date line into two 7.5° gores that differ from UTC by ±12 hours.Ships are supposed to adopt the standard time of a country if they are within its territorial waters within 12 nautical miles (14 mi; 22 km) of land, then revert to international time zones (15° wide pole-to-pole gores) as soon as they leave.Proceeding from north to south, the first deviation of the IDL from 180° is to pass to the east of Wrangel Island and the Chukchi Peninsula, the easternmost part of Russian Siberia. Two US-owned uninhabited atolls, Howland Island and Baker Island, just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean (and ships at sea between 172.5°W and 180°), have the latest time on Earth (UTC−12 hours).

(Wrangel Island lies directly on the meridian at 71°32′N 180°0′E, also noted as 71°32′N 180°0′W.) It then bends considerably west of 180°, passing west of St. The IDL circumscribes Kiribati by swinging far to the east, almost reaching the 150°W meridian.

During the second hour (UTC –) one of the calendar dates is limited to an uninhabited maritime time zone twelve hours behind UTC (UTC−12).

According to the clock, the first areas to experience a new day and a New Year are islands that use UTC 14.

The areas that are the first to see the daylight of a new day vary by the season.

Around the June solstice, the first area would be anyplace within the Kamchatka Time Zone (UTC 12) that is far enough north to experience midnight sun on the given date.

Kiribati's easternmost islands, the southern Line Islands south of Hawaii, have the most advanced time on Earth, UTC 14 hours.